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INRA
24, chemin de Borde Rouge –Auzeville – CS52627
31326 Castanet Tolosan CEDEX - France

Dernière mise à jour : Mai 2018

Menu Logo Principal

Plantes et Système de cultures Horticoles

Zone de texte éditable et éditée et rééditée

Hélène Gautier

Director of research

Hélène GAUTIER

Directeur  de Recherche

Lab. Plantes et Systèmes de culture Horticoles

Equipe : Ecophysiologie des Plantes Horticoles

CONTACTS

INRA Unité PSH (UR 1115)

Domaine St Paul,Site agroparc

CS 40509

84914 Avignon Cedex 9

Tel : (33) 432 72 23 45

Email : helene.gautier@avignon.inra.fr

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  • POSITIONS AND EDUCATION

1991 - PhD thesis in Plant Physiology, Toulouse University and Centre de Cadarache, CEA, Saint Paul lez Durance, France: “Physiology of stomata. Response of guard cell protoplasts to blue light”.

  • RESERARCH TOPIC

1992 to 1997: INRA Forage Station studying plant ecophysiology. Environment and Agronomy Department, INRA Lusignan, France.
I worked on morphogenetic responses of forage plants to their light environment (quantity and spectral distribution of light) in order to determine the respective role of cryptochrome or phytochrome photoreceptors in plant morphogenesis regulation. The applied objective was to better understand the impact of light environment on plant space colonisation and plant survival.
1998 to 2000: INRA Bioclimatology Unit, Environment and Agronomy Department, Avignon, France.
I worked on the effects of changes in the climatic environment (VPD…) and cultural practices (fruit pruning, irrigation, and planting density) on tomato leaf growth and plant architecture and estimated the impact on light intercepted by the plant. The applied objective was to determine whether plant photosynthesis could be a limiting factor under different stressful environments during summer time under greenhouse.
From 2001 till now: I have joined the Fruit Quality Ecophysiology group (Environment and Agronomy Department, INRA, Avignon) to study the effects of cultural management practices (irrigation with saline water, plant density, deleafing, nitrogen supply) and climatic environment (light, temperature, shading …) on the organoleptic and nutraceutical quality of tomato fruit. Our team objectives are to better understand and model the joint effects of genome and environment on fruit quality. More specifically, my objectives are to determine how environmental factors affect tomato fruit content in sugars and antioxidants (carotenoids mostly lycopene and beta-carotene and vitamin C). I focus on the regulation and relation between sugars accumulation and these antioxidant compounds under limiting or stressful environment. The applied objective is to determine the combination of pre and postharvest environmental conditions which optimise fruit content in sugars and antioxidants.

  • PUBLICATIONS

22 peer-reviewed scientific papers. A selection is given hereafter.

Gautier H, Rocci A, Buret M, Grasselly D, Dumas Y, Causse M. 2005a. Effect of photoselective filters on the physical and chemical traits of vine ripened tomato fruits. Canadian Journal of Plant Science: 85 (2) 439-446.

Gautier H, Rocci A, Buret M, Grasselly D, Causse M. 2005b. Interactions between Fruit load or fruit position alters response to temperature and subsequently cherry tomato quality. Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture: 85 (6) 1009-1016.

Gautier H, Diakou-Verdin V, Bénard C, Reich M, Buret M, Bourgaud F, Poëssel JL, Caris-Veyrat C, Génard M. 2008. How does tomato quality (sugar, acid, and nutritional quality) vary with ripening stage, temperature and irradiance? J Agric. Food Chem. 56 : 1241-1250.

Gautier H, Massot C, Stevens R, Sérino S, Génard M. 2009a. Regulation of tomato fruit ascorbate content is more highly dependent on fruit irradiance than leaf irradiance. Annals of Botany 103: 495-504.

Gautier H, Lopez-Lauri F, Massot C, Murshed R, Marty I, Grasselly D, Keller C, Sallanon H, Génard M. 2009b. Impact of ripening and salinity on tomato fruit ascorbate content and enzymatic activities related to ascorbate recycling. Sous presse special issue of Functional Plant Science and Biotechnology: Antioxidant Properties of Crops.

Bénard C, Gautier H, Bourgaud F, Grasselly D, Navez B, Caris-Veyrat C, Weiss M, Génard M. 2009. Effects of low nitrogen supply on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit yield and quality with special emphasis on sugars, acids, ascorbate, carotenoids, and phenolic compounds. J Agric. Food Chem. 57, 4112–4123.